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The Lull Premium Gel Memory Foam Mattress

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GEL MEMORY FOAM MATRESS

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LIFE-CHANGING SLEEP with lull

Get comfort and therapeutic support if you sleep on your back, front, or side.
Each layer works together to help you enjoy a restful night of sleep.

SPINE ALIGNMENT

THERAPEUTIC SUPPORT

The Lull Mattress supports and cradles your body to provide healthy spine alignment while you sleep. 1.5" transition layer made from a proprietary blend of premium foam combined with our 7" high-density polyurethane core support layer ensures the proper body alignment while you are sleeping. A healthy spine position allows your muscles to rest throughout the night and wake up refreshed in the morning.

RESPONSIVE

RIGHT AMOUNT OF BOUNCE BACK

A common complaint about memory foam mattresses is that you sink and get stuck. Not with Lull. Our proprietary blend of premium foam was designed with just the right amount of bounce-back in mind. The 1.5" transition layer responds and supports your body so you don't get that sinking feeling or a trampoline-like experience.

MOTION TRANSFER

SLEEP THROUGH THE NIGHT

Lull's multiple layers of responsive foam absorb movement so you don’t feel your partner (and pets) when they get up in the middle of the night.

LASTING DURABILITY

BETTER SLEEP FOR YEARS TO COME

Our 7" core support layer is made of high-quality polyurethane foam. This layer adds strength, durability and structure to the mattress. No sagging here. We use only the best foams to ensure your mattress provides an exceptional sleep experience for years to come.

PRESSURE RELIEF

STOP MORNING ACHES & PAINS

Lull’s 1.5" top layer memory foam evenly distributes weight and contours to your body’s curves, which provides relief for pressure points – joints, lower back & neck. Memory foam and specialty foams ensure the proper lumbar and neck support.

TEMPERATURE

IDEAL SLEEP TEMPERATURE

The ideal temperature for sleeping is 69 degrees. Lull's 1.5" viscoelastic memory foam top layer is injected with a gel polymer, specifically designed to transfer heat away from your body when it is warm by dispersing your body heat throughout the mattress. Breathable top-tick fibers and open cell foam structure promote enhanced airflow to help heat flow freely away from you.


ALL ABOUT SLEEP - NATIONAL HEART, LUNG & BLOOD INSTITUTE

Many factors play a role in preparing your body to fall asleep and wake up. You have an internal "body clock" that controls when you're awake and when your body is ready for sleep.

The body clock typically has a 24-hour repeating rhythm (called the circadian rhythm). Two processes interact to control this rhythm. The first is a pressure to sleep that builds with every hour that you're awake. This drive for sleep reaches a peak in the evening, when most people fall asleep.

A compound called adenosine (ah-DEN-o-seen) seems to be one factor linked to this drive for sleep. While you're awake, the level of adenosine in your brain continues to rise. The increasing level of this compound signals a shift toward sleep. While you sleep, your body breaks down adenosine.

A second process involves your internal body clock. This clock is in sync with certain cues in the environment. Light, darkness, and other cues help determine when you feel awake and when you feel drowsy.

For example, light signals received through your eyes tell a special area in your brain that it is daytime. This area of your brain helps align your body clock with periods of the day and night.

Your body releases chemicals in a daily rhythm, which your body clock controls. When it gets dark, your body releases a hormone called melatonin (mel-ah-TONE-in). Melatonin signals your body that it's time to prepare for sleep, and it helps you feel drowsy.

The amount of melatonin in your bloodstream peaks as the evening wears on. Researchers believe this peak is an important part of preparing your body for sleep.

Exposure to bright artificial light in the late evening can disrupt this process, making it hard to fall asleep. Examples of bright artificial light include the light from a TV screen, computer screen, or a very bright alarm clock.

As the sun rises, your body releases cortisol (KOR-tih-sol). This hormone naturally prepares your body to wake up.

The rhythm and timing of the body clock change with age. Teens fall asleep later at night than younger children and adults. One reason for this is because melatonin is released and peaks later in the 24-hour cycle for teens. As a result, it's natural for many teens to prefer later bedtimes at night and sleep later in the morning than adults. 

People also need more sleep early in life, when they're growing and developing. For example, newborns may sleep more than 16 hours a day, and preschool-aged children need to take naps.

Young children tend to sleep more in the early evening. Teens tend to sleep more in the morning. Also, older adults tend to go to bed earlier and wake up earlier. 

The patterns and types of sleep also change as people mature. For example, newborn infants spend more time in REM sleep. The amount of slow-wave sleep (a stage of non-REM sleep) peaks in early childhood and then drops sharply after puberty. It continues to decline as people age.

For more information about what makes you sleep, go to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's "Your Guide to Healthy Sleep."


Sleeping Tips from The National Sleep Foundation:

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good sleep hygiene. Try to keep the following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

  1. Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends. This helps to regulate your body's clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.
  2. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.
  3. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can't fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.
  4. Exercise daily. Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.
  5. Evaluate your room. Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool – between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner's sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, "white noise" machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.
  6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up during the night.
  7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms. Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.
  8. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening. Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.
  9. Wind down. Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping,avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.
  10. If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired. It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.
  11. If you’re still having trouble sleeping, don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to find a sleep professional. You may also benefit from recording your sleep in a Sleep Diary to help you better evaluate common patterns or issues you may see with your sleep or sleeping habits.

 

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